Post 369: Olympics

We don’t have a tv, but we love things like World Series’, Super Bowls’ (which the kids call the brain damage sport) and of course the Olympics.

So I signed up for some streaming service in order to watch the 2018 games in Pyeongchang. Little did I know, or more realistically, I was completely fooling myself that the screen exposure would come at great cost.

This morning before school I heard no less then four comments made between Luke and Lily about Jack in the Box, Shaq, Big Macs and Oreos. The Oreos commercial was even played out after school eating real Oreos while both kids mimicked the commercial with incredible accuracy.

I watched too much tv as a child, there is no doubt. So much so that I memorized the tv listings between 3:30p when I got home and 7pm when I guess it was time to start getting ready for bed. I spent pretty much every afternoon glued to the “idiot box“. Did it rot my brain?, no, but other than a vast amount of useless trivia and a small amount of relatively useless pop culture memories, it certainly did not add anything good for my life except keep me company. The time spent mindlessly watching could have been put the much better use.

So I decided to “pause” the Olympics. I expected some push back from the kids, but instead a wonderful thing happened! The Olympics didn’t stop! The kids just kept on going with their own.

  • 1. One man bobsled on the front lawn (which is totally flat) using our plastic snow sleds.
  • 2. Curling in the hallway with brooms and marbles
  • 3. Ice dancing in the living room, singles and doubles and I am so sorry to say that I was unable to capture any movies of this, because it was glorious, especially the part where Luke was picking up Lily and twirling her.

The games did continue another day and I decided to go a little overboard with the documentation, as is my style. Below is some “live” coverage.

Post 368: We are all animals

The other day we were entering a playground and the sign on the gate stated:

“No animals allowed beyond this point”

Lily asked me what the sign said, I told her, she then replied:

“But Daddy, we are animals?”

Its the logic and truth and simplicity that always reminds me that kids are smarter than all of us.

Post 367: All grown up

This morning I was struck by you , little Lily. After you had put your clothes on and showed up for some breakfast, I just couldn’t believe it, you had grown up some how. It was just plain as day.

I teared up, though did a great job of holding back and asked if I could take your picture, you said sure.

You used to mug at the camera, but not today.

I know it happens, and I know it is all good, but I cant stop thinking about it. Lily, you are indeed the apple of my eye, but you are no longer little Lily.

With love and admiration,

-Dad

Post 363: Super Charged Minivan Heaven

Ever since reading that you can change the startup screen on the Toyota minivan console I have been meaning to. I just love that kind of stuff.

Yesterday I was finally ready to do it and realized I didn’t know what I wanted my custom image to look like?, then I thought, hey why not photoshop up a minvan-copter? The kids will love it!

Of course the idea of adding some sort of aeronautical device to the minivan is almost as old as this blog, but for whatever reason, Luke has been talking about it a lot recently.

The original concept was wooden wings, but Luke soon confessed he felt they would be too cumbersome. The recent version is a helicopter prop, so I put both ideas together and came up with this:

I loaded into the car,  I go get Luke from school, he sees it instantly and goes:

“What’s that?”

I explain it was something I did.

“That looks pretty good, Dad, good idea. If that is your finished plan then all I think I need to add is some polyurethane.”

Sounds great Luke.

A day later he comes up to me and states very matter of factually:

“I’m going to have to see the gas tank. I need to see if there is enough room for a super charger?”

Ok, Luke, sounds good.

“The super charger will allow the minivan to go 120,000 miles an hour” he says with raised eye brows.

“It will only take two minutes to get to Legoland!”

I do some quick math out loud and discover it will take closer to 2 seconds at that speed to get to Legoland and Luke is now REALLY impressed.

The other part of the equation is how much is NOT on his radar and I believe it is linked to access to media. My example is this. Luke loves Lego’s, Luke will stroll down the Lego aisle at Target and study the boxes and point out all kinds of detailed thoughts. Luke has never seen a Lego movie. So why is it that he never ONCE has asked about the Lego movie posters that a strewn about the world, on the side of buses only inches from his face sometimes, never says a word. If we had seen a Lego movie I believe it would be otherwise.

Meanwhile a super charged mini-copter is TOTALLY on his radar, big time!

Post 359: Nine years!

[After the equilibrium/dis-equilibrium post (358) I got a wonderful reply from Luke’s teacher with a few articles on the “Nine Year Crisis”]

Luke’s amazing teacher sent me links to two articles about the nine-year crisis that capture what is going on in Luke’s world. (I know Luke is not nine, but that is part of the wonderful world of child development, NOTHING is set in stone). Once again it is empowering to know we are not alone on this:

Parenting The Nine Year Old

The Nine Year Change

Other than the profound nature of what this all means for my dear boy, there is a piece that particularly caught my eye about the celestial nature of this crisis period.

The position of the stars at birth, some say, holds the destiny of the human being. It takes eighteen years, seven months and nine days for the stars to circle back into that exact position. This moment of re-positioning is called a Lunar Node.  Often at these moments, every eighteen years and seven months, people tend to change their lives. It is as if the stars in their original position call to the human being and remind them of their true destiny, their true course in life.  We re-adjust.  The Institute of Noetic Sciences in a 25 year research project on transformative experiences noticed in the research that moments of transformation—Epiphanies—tend to cluster around the ages of eighteen/nineteen; 36 to 38; 55 to 58.  Nine-years-old is halfway round the celestial path and it is as if, the stars call the child to grow, to comprehend, and to remember the importance of his or her tasks on Earth.

(from Being Nine Years Old)